28 Years Old Odisha Man Builds Private Satellite

0 cm cube-sized communication satellite will be launched into space by a U.S.-based firm in Nov. Gurudatta Panda, a 28-year-old from Odisha’s Berhampur, is part of a small team of technocrats that built a satellite for a private satellite design, manufacturing and management company. The eight-member team, including Mr. Panda, from Hyderabad-based Exseed Space Private Limited has constructed 10 cm cube-sized communication satellite, which will be launched into space by the United States-based SpaceX in November.

Speaking to press, Mr. Panda said the small satellite will carry a linear transponder on FM for voice communication. Last phase tests of the satellite are being conducted. He claimed this is the first of its kind private space endeavour. Through private companies like his, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) now plans to groom space start-ups that build new solutions in communication satellites, applications from remote sensing and rocketry. This satellite will serve the ham or the amateur radio community. As a result, it will be of great help during natural calamities, when conventional communication services get disrupted.

After the launch, this artificial satellite will be on a polar orbit with two passes over India everyday. The public will be able to receive this artificial satellite’s beacon on 145.90 Mhz using a TV tuner and USB dongles, Mr. Panda added. He said the eight-member team involved in construction of the small private satellite involved four technocrats and four managerial staff members. He and Exseed Space co-founder Ashhar Farhan were the communication engineers who played a key role in building the satellite. Sources said this small communication satellite has been constructed a cost of less than ₹20 lakh.

Love satellites for space

A Japanese start-up linked to the University of Tsukuba is set to launch small satellites with commemorative titanium plaques carrying love messages into space by the end of 2019, the company said. Those interested would be able to engrave messages of their choice on the plaques, which would be 1.8 centimeters long and 0.8 centimeter wide, set to be carried to space aboard the satellites and orbit around the Earth for around two years before being destroyed, Efe reported. Around 10 centimeters in size, the CubeSat satellites would be able to carry up to 600 pure titanium plaques and would be transported to the International Space Station (ISS) by a rocket of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. In the ISS, the astronauts stationed there will take photographs of the ultra-small satellite which would be then sent to the couples to prove that their messages have reached space, Warspace CEO Toshihiro Kameda said.

Although they have not determined the number of people interested in the service yet, couples from Japan, the US and Taiwan have contacted the company. The mini satellites and the plaques would be destroyed after two years by burning up when they come in contact with Earth’s atmosphere, said Kameda, a professor who teaches the mechanics of materials at the University of Tsukuba. If this service receives a good response, Warspace would expand its business and will send out more commemorative objects into space which would later return to Earth, the head of the project said.

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